Heartland

Coronavirus Hits Already-Vulnerable Heartland Oil And Gas Industries Hard

oil-rig-and-cows-in-the-heartland-1400x-q100.jpg

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to wreak havoc on many areas of the economy, the Heartland's oil and gas industry is poised to take one of the hardest hits. In particular, Texas, Oklahoma, North Dakota and Louisiana are likely to face severe impacts. At a national level, the most severe economic damage from COVID-19 will disproportionately hit a handful of sectors – travel, tourism, lodging, dining and recreation.  read more »

Coronavirus Regional Economic Impacts and Policy Responses

airport-terminal-unsplash.jpg

Most regions were beginning to see an acceleration in economic growth during January and February 2020. The 20-state Heartland was poised to see a notable improvement in economic performance that will now be tested due to public health measures implemented to contain the spread of the coronavirus. The additional $200 billion in purchases of grain, industrial supplies and manufactured products over the next two years that China agreed to in the Phase I trade deal will benefit the Heartland greater than any other region of the nation.  read more »

Millennials Find New Hope in the Heartland

millennials-moving-to-heartland.jpg

In “Millennials Find New Hope In The Heartland,” Heartland Forward Senior Fellow Joel Kotkin and his contributors address a fundamental topic for future economic success in the Heartland: Will Millennials return and remain at higher rates?  read more »

The Vital Midwest

john-austin-midwest-map.jpg

John Austin at the Michigan Economic Center is a long time commentator on Midwest economic issues, going back to at least his 2006 Brookings Institute report “The Vital Center.”  read more »

Houston Is Now Less Affordable Than New York City?!

cox-houston.jpg

"There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics." -Mark Twain  read more »

Heartland Intelligence

Indianapolis-downtown.jpg

There have been some big changes for me. We relocated from New York to Indianapolis, where I’m doing consulting work for the Indy Chamber. I’m no longer full time with the Manhattan Institute but am still a contributing editor at City Journal and still have multiple projects in the works there. I’ll continue to write for other publications too, as with my recent Atlantic piece on J. Irwin Miller and Columbus, Indiana. More on my move below.  read more »

Beyond Policy: Why Democrats Need to Show White Working-Class Voters Some Respect

sherrod-brown.jpg

When I heard Hillary Clinton refer to half of Trump supporters as "deplorables" during her 2016 presidential campaign, I knew she would lose. Her comment exemplified the arrogant, elitist, dismissive attitudes that make many white working-class voters suspicious of the Democratic Party. Four years later, as Democrats try to figure out how to beat one of the least popular Republican presidents ever, they're still trying to get over their deplorables problem.  read more »

More on Columbus, Indiana

NorthChristianChurch-300x225.jpg

I want to share a few additional thoughts on Columbus, looking at the question of whether things really could have been different in the Rust Belt with different policies. I believe the answer is Yes, with caveats.  read more »

The Rust Belt Didn't Have to Happen

miller-esquire-232x300.jpg

I knew a number of things about J. Irwin Miller, the former Cummins Engine CEO who financed Columbus, Indiana’s world-renowned collection of modernist architectural masterpieces.  But when I read Nancy’s Kriplen’s recent short biography of him, I learned a lot I’d never suspected. Clearly one of the most distinguished Hoosiers of all time, among other things, Esquire magazine put him on its cover in 1967 saying that he should be the next President of the United States.  That was a pipe dream, of course.  read more »

How Trump Can Win Again

Trump_with_supporters_in_Panama_City_Beach_2019.jpg

By all rights, Donald Trump should be packing his bags and headed to the golf links and his favorite fast food restaurant. Never popular, he has done little to expand his base over the past three years. Unlike previous officeholders, many from more humble beginnings, he also demonstrably has failed to grow in the job.  read more »