Asia

A Clash of Values

hong-kong-protests-sept2019.jpg

Most American concerns with China revolve around economic issues, and, for some, the threat posed by that country’s expanding military. But China’s real existential challenge is not over market shares or submarines, but in a battle of values. Right now, it does not seem we are certain to win.

China presents the most profound challenge to liberal values since the end of the Cold War, a development that has caught our consistently lame political establishment by surprise. The leaders of both parties, and much of the corporate America, never saw it coming.  read more »

Energy to Synergy: the Policy Plight of Resource-Dependent Cities

dubai-skyline-by-trey-ratcliff.jpg

The Green New Deal, an ambitious US congressional resolution introduced in 2019 that met substantial political pushback and failed to gain official approval, proposed among other things to provide housing, health care, and jobs via an economic stimulus package targeting green technology.  read more »

China's Looming Class Struggle

charl-folscher-china-class-struggle.jpg

Westerners tend to identify China’s coming political crisis with developments such as the brave, educated, and often English-speaking protests in Hong Kong. Although they undoubtably pose an annoyance to Xi Jinping’s regime, the real existential challenge to the regime derives not from China’s middle orders but from the very classes that gave birth to the Communist regime.  read more »

China's Urban Crisis

1200px-China_Resources_Headquarters_Nanshan_Shenzhen_China.jpg

China stands as the primary exhibit of twenty-first-century urbanism. At a time when elite cities in the West barely manage to grow in population, Chinese cities have emerged out of virtually nothing, as hundreds of millions of people have moved from farm to city.  read more »

The Shanghai to Changzhou Adjacent Urban Areas (with a Photographic Tour)

Untitled.jpg

After China’s Guangzhou-Hong Kong adjacent urban areas in the Pearl River Delta (see: “Ultimate City: The Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area”), the second most expansive urbanization in the world stretches from Shanghai to Changzhou in China.  read more »

Wildlife Crime Threatens Species and Fuels Transnational Crime

elephant-herd.jpg

If you’ve ever seen a herd of elephants moving majestically across an African savannah, you’ll always remember the experience. Equally memorable yet horrifying is the sight of a dead animal killed by a poacher for its tusks.  read more »

Chinese Sci-Fi Writers Give Us A Glimpse Into China’s Dystopian Present And Future

1200px-Beijing_traffic_-_panoramio.jpg

A thoroughly scientific dictatorship will never be overthrown — Aldous Huxley

In contemporary China, it’s hard to know what people outside the party dictatorship think about the future. As in the former Soviet Union, often the best guide may be not in the controlled media or cowed academia, but in the speculative wanderings of writers.  read more »

Energy Storage Isn’t Ready for Wide Deployment

Hornsdale_Australia.jpg

When understanding and examining energy storage for wide-scale, societal deployment that is scalable, affordable and reliable these factors need to be included: energy security, renewable power production and cyber security. At this time energy storage doesn’t meet any of these criteria.  read more »

Subjects:

Ultimate City: Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area (with Photographic Tour)

800px-West_section_of_Hong_Kong-Zhuhai-Macau_Bridge_(20180902174105).jpg

The Pearl River (Zhujiang) Delta has developed into the world’s ultimate city (Figure 1). More people live in the urbanization there than in any space of similar size in the world (Figure 2). Once home to separate urban enclaves comprising 9 million residents in 1980, the now adjacent urban areas of the Pearl River Delta are home to 55 million residents, nearly one-half more in either the Yangtze Delta adjacent urban areas (which have undergone a similar development process) or the Tokyo-Yokohama urban area with 38 million residents (Note 1).  read more »

The Value of All Things Crazily Rich and Asian

Michelle-Yeoh-Henry-Golding-and-Constance-Wu-in-Crazy-Rich-Asians.jpg

Neither Kevin Kwan’s novel “Crazy Rich Asians” nor the movie based on it should win any prizes as literature or film. Yet the “Crazy” phenomena — both the best-selling book, its sequels and the smash movie — represent a critical moment not only in Asian, and Asian-American, history, but in how we look at race.  read more »