Obama's Home Town

Harper_Midway_Chicago.jpg

Hyde Park, in Chicago, is where President Obama called home before moving to Pennsylvania Avenue.

I once called 5118 S. Dorchester home.

Hyde Park is a college town surrounded by – but not really part of – a big city. The University of Chicago, founded in 1890, is the heart of the community. The campus was built of Indiana limestone, fake Gothic, and made to look old from its very inception. Some people like it.  read more »

There’s No Place Like Home, Americans are Returning to Localism

iStock_000007772328XSmall.jpg

On almost any night of the week, Churchill's Restaurant is hopping. The 10-year-old hot spot in Rockville Centre, Long Island, is packed with locals drinking beer and eating burgers, with some customers spilling over onto the street. "We have lots of regulars—people who are recognized when they come in," says co-owner Kevin Culhane. In fact, regulars make up more than 80 percent of the restaurant's customers. "People feel comfortable and safe here," Culhane says. "This is their place."  read more »

Too Big To Fail Needs to Go

demolishing an office tower.jpg

One of the causes of last year’s financial collapse was the adoption of the concept, 'Too Big To Fail'. Washington decided long ago that some firms are so large and so integral to the economy that the failure of one of these firms would put the entire economy at risk. So, the government insures them at no cost.  read more »

Subjects:

Central Banking: Feds Rule The Game

Federal Reserve.jpg

In mid-September President Barack Obama mounted Theodore Roosevelt’s bully pulpit and railed against market greed to an audience of corporate tycoons. The objects of his derision included, and were limited to, bankers, financiers, and speculators in the 'private' financial community. Notably absent from the enemy bankers list were quasi-government banking corporations and America’s central bankers.  read more »

Can Silicon Valley Attract the Right Workforce for its Next Turnaround?

iStock_000003052676XSmall.jpg

In less than 30 years, Silicon Valley has rocketed to celebrity status. The region serves as the top magnet for innovation, often occupying the coveted #1 position of global hot spot rankings. More of an informal shared experience than a physical place, Silicon Valley capitalizes on being centrally located in the San Francisco Bay Area, a broader regional zone that is an economic powerhouse.  read more »

Mexico's Real War: It's Not Drugs

iStock_000008589163XSmall.jpg

Balding, affable and passionate, Uranio Adolfo Arrendondo may not be a general or political leader, but he stands on the front lines of a critical battle facing Mexico in the coming decade. This struggle is not primarily about the drug wars, which dominate the media coverage--and thus our perceptions--of our southern neighbor. It concerns the economic and political forces stunting the aspirations of its people.  read more »

On Cities, GHG Emissions, Apples & Oranges

ghg-report-inset.png

Every day or so a new greenhouse gas emission report crosses my desk. Often these reports are very useful, other times they add little of value to the subject. The problem is separating the “wheat” from the “chaff.”

This dilemma is well illustrated by a paper called “Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Global Cities,” authored by 10 academics. I had received notification of the paper from Science Daily, a useful website that provides notification of new research on a wide range of scientific subjects.  read more »

Germany's Role in the Green Energy Economy

iStock_000009512590XSmall.jpg

Germany likes to brag about its green credentials. It is a source of pride and it is justified to a certain extent. The country, which is located on the same latitude as Canada, had the largest number of installed solar panels as of 2007.  read more »

Crash in High-end Real Estate or a Roller Coaster Recession? :

changinglandscape.jpg

During the first ten days of October 2008, the Dow Jones dropped 2,399.47 points, losing trillions of investor equity. The Federal Government pushed TARP, a $700 billion bail-out, through Congress to rescue the beleaguered financial institutions. The collapse of the financial system was likened to an earthquake. In reality, what happened was more like a shift of tectonic plates.

*******************************************  read more »

Homebuilding Rebound… Or Boredom in the Burbs?

suburb with mystic clouds-iStock_000007874407XSmall.jpg

The economy might come back – but will the housing market return? And in what form?

Right now, builders are jumping into the low end of the market because of the $8,000 first time home buyer tax credit. This tax credit cannot survive indefinitely. Compared to homes sold in 2006, today's are bare bones in size, materials and finishes in response to current, temporary market conditions. But the scrimping only makes the homes built in yesterday’s developments more attractive to potential buyers. The next wave of home buyers will have a choice: stay where they are, move to a more recently built (devalued) home, or buy new.  read more »