Geography

Iowa’s Next Election: Bridging the Urban-Rural and Class Divide

martin.jpg

My home state of Iowa famously gave Barack Obama a convincing victory in the Democratic caucuses in 2008, the first triumph that launched a young U.S. senator from Illinois to become the first African-American president. Obama ultimately won two terms, and each time Iowans favored him by considerable margins. Iowa was also one of several Midwestern states that famously flipped to support Donald Trump in 2016.  read more »

Watch Out! Here Come the ‘Woke’ Tech Oligarchs

15053958542_e68eea599f_z.jpg

Once the rich protected themselves by aligning with Republicans who would protect their property from high taxes and their firms from regulation.

Some still do—notably the Koch brothers—but this breed of right-winger is gradually losing out to more progressive tilted plutocrats.  read more »

American Migration: Exploring Where People Move Across America

Clark_County,_NV,_USA_-_panoramio_-_yesid_ferney_patiño_….jpg

Just a few years ago, experts indicated Americans (especially young Americans) were more interested in a different lifestyle than previous generations. Instead of owning a house in the suburbs, the new American dream consisted of renting an apartment in the city.  read more »

Can Lebron James Make Los Angeles Great Again?

4116197027_14fe977ccc_z.jpg

With his decision to move to Los Angeles, LeBron James has given our metropolis another reason to feel good about itself. When it comes to sports, and celebrity, Los Angeles’ lead is only growing, as evidenced by the recent movement of two football teams to the area, the proposed construction of a new basketball facility for the Clippers and the winning of the 2028 Olympics games.  read more »

Perspectives on Defining the American Heartland

photo.png

The following excerpt is from a new report, Perspectives on Defining the American Heartland, written by Ross DeVol, a Walton Family Foundation Fellow. Read the full report (PDF) here.  read more »

The Fight for Our Future Belongs to the ’Burbs

bright-daylight-flora-533416.jpg

Look away from President Trump and it’s easier to see how three long-term demographic and geographic trends are reshaping American politics.  read more »

Where U.S. Manufacturing Is Thriving In 2018

6813974736_1eac5cef6c_z (1).jpg

The ‘80s futurist John Naisbitt once called manufacturing a “a declining sport,” and to be sure the share of Americans working in factories has fallen far from the 1950 peak of 30% to roughly 8.5% last year.  read more »

Pervasive Suburbanization: The 2017 Data

DSC02634.JPG

The most recent Census Bureau population estimates have made it clear that migration to the suburbs and away from urban cores has accelerated dramatically since the early years of the Great Recession (see here and here).  read more »

Where College Grads Are Moving

Washington_Monument,_Washington,_D.C._04037u_original.jpg

The Wall Street Journal just ran an interesting interactive feature looking at where college grads move after graduation. They looked at 445 schools, and tracked destinations by metro area. They discovered that graduates, particularly from stronger schools, are flocking to major metro areas. The Big East, Ivy League, Pac-12, Big-12, ACC, and Big Ten are all over 70% in sending college grads to major metro areas (but see below for caveats).  read more »

The Evolving Urban Form: Madrid

Cuatro_Torres_Business_Area.JPG

Madrid is the capital of Spain, as well as its largest built-up urban area, with an estimated 6.4 million population in 2018. Madrid’s urban area plus economically connected rural and small town areas make up the metropolitan area, which has nearly 7,000,000 residents. The area has an urban population density of 4,700 per square kilometer (12,200 per square mile), ranking it third among the European Union’s built-up urban areas over 1,000,000 population.  read more »